Projection Mapping as an Event Activation for your Brand

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

  • What is Projection Mapping?

Projection Mapping is using video footage and displaying it over a 3D object to create a dynamic presentation. Projection Mapping is also referred to as ‘Spatial Augmented Reality” as it projecting digital information over a physical space.

  • How does Projection Mapping work?

Projection Mapping is the display of digital objects in the form of animated videos or recorded video footage onto 3D physical objects. It is different from flat-screen mapping as the visuals are able to appear wrapped around a 3D object – such as a building.

  • Why Projection Mapping?

Projection Mapping as an event activation or event display is a creative way to showcase information. It is interactive and brings an element of awe to the message you are portraying. Traditional means of getting information to your audience at events are dying out as “boring” as interactive technology make it more exciting.

  • Examples of Projection Mapping

Examples of Projection Mapping can be found right here in Dubai. Have you been to Dubai Festival City Mall and watched the fountain and light display? The fountain is used as a surface onto which video footage is projected.

 

Another example is where Fanta Middle East used Projection Mapping as a way to market their product at Dubai Mall.

 

 

 

 

Dubai Future Accelerators, HTC Vive, Burj Khalifa, and Virtuality

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

Dubai Future Accelerators launched the ‘VR and Beyond” challenge in partnership with Burj Khalifa and HTC Vive Middle East.

There were 118 applicants from all over the world, and Virtuality is proud to be a local company part of the top 6 finalists.

Our talented team has been busy with production for the past month, and will be presenting our prototype later this week.

 

AR & VR Definitions – PART 1: Augmented Reality

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

We have noticed a break in the communication between VR and AR consumers, and VR and AR service and content providers. Here is a breakdown of terminology used in the industry to help you, as the client, get your request across and to understand what we mean when we say…

1 – Augmented Reality

Simply put, Augmented Reality is the construction of virtual objects which are then displayed as part of a real environment. A mobile device with a lens and a screen is required to make use of AR applications.

2 – Photogrammetry

Photogrammetry is a process by which measurements of a three-dimensional object are taken from a two-dimensional image. It is a process used to digitize physical objects and implement them in AR applications.

3 – Image Target

A visual marker that is scanned by an AR application. This trigger is programmed to project AR simulations on a mobile screen. Content can be in the form of 3D objects, photographs, and videos. These can be interactive as well.

4 – Surface Tracking

An AR application scans the environment for tables, walls, or floors as surfaces on which to display AR content.

5 – 3D vs Video Content

AR content can be displayed as 3D models or standard videos.

How to create 3D models using Photogrammetry

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

Photogrammetry is a process by which measurements of a three-dimensional object are taken from a two-dimensional image. It is a process used to digitize physical objects and implement them in AR applications.

It is used in industries such as architecture, engineering, and geology. It can also be used for art galleries, restaurants, and retail.

There are two stages to Photogrammetry; Capturing and Processing.

 

Capturing:

This is where physical objects are photographed from every angle possible. It is important that even, white lighting is used to keep colours balanced and shadows to a minimum.

The image quality determines the quality of the final model, so using a camera that can produce high resolution images is best.

 

Processing:

The images are imported into a Photogrammetry software and aligned. Once alignment is complete, an automated process converts the images into a rough mesh of the model. The model is then refined, rendered, and textured.

 

 

At this stage, the object is a high-poly model. In order to use it in any application it needs to be simplified, and then it is ready to be exported.

Without this process, objects would need to be created from scratch on 3D software, making Photogrammetry a time-saver.

 

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