How 3D, AR, VR, Photography, and Videography work together

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

The fields of photography and videography, Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality, and 3D design all pull pieces of information from both art and science, and so contribute to each field as well.

Each of these fields borrow from and lend to each other as well. The purpose of this blog post is to show how they all interact and how innovation is born from these interactions.

Photography and videography go hand-in-hand in that they are the same thing, but one is still and the other is in motion. The nature of both come with different benefits for different purposes. There is an example v below.

Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality also offer the same thing in different ways. They both offer an extension and enhancement of reality, but Augmented Reality offers it through a mobile device, while Virtual Reality offers it through a head-mounted device.

Photography and videography are used in Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality to create the alternate realities. 3D design is also used to create environments, characters, and special effects and animations.

The best example of how all of these fields can be integrated is found in the innovation of digital portals.

A digital portal can be opened in Augmented Reality or Virtual Reality, depending on the preferred device. Using 360 photography, a person can walk into the portal with their device and have a look at a certain location.

Using 360 videography, a person can walk into the portal and, not only look at the environment, but also see how people interact with the environment. 360 videography is commonly used in Virtual Reality experiences and films.

An example of a location that you can view in one of our portals can be found here.

 

AR & VR Definitions – PART 4: Extended Reality

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

Extended Reality, abbreviated as ‘XR,’ is exactly what it sounds like; it is the expansion of reality by using digital simulations and applications.

Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Mixed Reality technologies enhance physical reality by enabling users to add digital information to their physical spaces, or by immersing them into a different reality. Extended Reality is essentially the umbrella term for Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, and Mixed Reality.

If you would like to read up on certain definitions pertaining to Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, or Mixed Reality, then you can click on the topic of your choice and you will be directed to our blog posts about them.

If you have any questions about any of these technologies, please do not hesitate to contact us through our web chat or any of our social media platforms.

AR & VR Definitions – PART 3: Mixed Reality

BY KAYLA NOBREGA

 

1 – Mixed Reality

Mixed Reality is the merging of the physical world with the digital world. It is a more immersive form of Augmented Reality where digital simulations are able to accurately interact with the environment. For example, a digital character can hide behind your physical curtains. This is not a form of Virtual Reality as it still includes the external environment.

2 – Spatial Mapping

Spatial mapping is a method of scanning a physical environment using Mixed Reality hardware (such as the HoloLens or HTC Vive Pro) in order to produce a 3D mesh of the space. The Mixed Reality hardware is then able to display digital simulations in relation to the physical aspects of the space.

3 – Occlusion

Occlusion in Mixed Reality is when an augmented object is obscured from view by a physical object. This is what would enable the digital character to hide behind the physical curtains from the first example. Occlusion is one of the features that distinguishes Mixed Reality from Augmented Reality.

4 – Fields of View

A field of view in Mixed Reality pertains to how wide the view is in the Mixed Reality hardware. The wider the view, the more immersive the experience.

5 – Latency

Latency is a term used in the world of Mixed Reality, as well as Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality. It is the time between a simulation and a response, so in the case of Mixed Reality, it is when the digital simulation does not react to the user’s movements or the external environment immediately. Gamers would use the term “lag” instead.

Interesting Fact:

An interesting fact about Mixed Reality is that its capabilities are based on physics in the sense that if you throw an augmented ball at a physical wall, the technology will enable the ball to bounce off the wall even though it is a simulation. The ball will bounce off the wall and on the floor as if you had thrown an actual one.